Inspirations

Inspirations
The color you see is the color you get!

Saturday, September 8, 2012

a nice cold one...

Hello all my wonderful friends!

There is something wonderfully nostalgic and relaxing about soaking in the last warm rays of summer with a good book and an ice cold soda in your hand. 

However, when  the sun is sinking low beneath the horizon, the last few pages of your book are read, and all that remains in your glass is a puddle of melted ice, you are left with a question.... 

What to do with the soda can?

Yes, I know, there are many places to recycle cans... There is, though, another option...

As I have perused the local craft store's isles, I have noticed that you can buy thin sheets of metal that can be embossed, die cut, stamped, etc. They have intrigued me for a while, but, I just never seem to put any in my cart... And from this, a spark of inspiration hits....

Soda cans are just a cylinder of thin metal...

Step 1: Prepping the can... Rinse out the soda can with soap and water. You want to remove all sticky residue.  Afterwards, allow to dry.


Step 2: Creating a sheet.  Take a razor blade and carefully cut off the top and bottom of the can. 

*WARNING: This technique involves sharp edges. Please be careful. Metal cuts hurt worse than paper cuts!*


Step 3: Die cutting. Place your metal sheet in your manual die cut machine. Tape down the die if it doesn't want to stay in place. Run it through.  You can also use scissors if you want to hand cut.

Step 4: Embossing. Place metal in an embossing folder and run it through your machine. Metal holds texture fabulously, however, it is not as giving as paper. Because of this, you may need to alter your "sandwich" (the stack of plates) so that there is less pressure. You may still find that some of the metal tears in the deep impressions, but I don't mind it much, so I've never really tried to get one completely rip free. 

Step 5: Base coat. Apply a layer of white or cream acrylic paint or gesso. This will  allow the next layer of paint to really pop.  The metal is a non-porus surface, so if you apply the paint with a brush, you will see brush strokes. I like to use a makeup wedge and pounce the paint on. It won't leave brush marks, and it gives the piece a little bit of tooth (texture).

Step 6: Adding color.  Apply a layer or two of Creative Inspirations Paint. Again, if you use a brush, it will leave strokes, so I pounce.

Step 7: Sanding.  Gently sand the paint off of the raised areas. This will allow the metal to show through and give a nice contrast and definition to the piece as well as giving it a more distressed or shabby look.

Step 8: Clean Up. Use a stiff bristled brush to brush off all paint dust and metal filings. Use a lint roller to clean up your table top. Be careful with the metal filing. I don't want anyone hurt!

And now, you have a fabulous metal embellishment to use!  The fun part of this is that you can do as many or as few of the steps as you desire to get the perfect look for your project!

I love the contrast between the shimmery paint and the shiny metal!  Fun, huh!

Well, until next time, drink, paint, and create!

Enjoy!


8 comments:

Mummy lade said...

brilliant!

Rose said...

Kassi this is awesome!!!

Kimberly said...

What a fun idea, and it looks gorgeous! hugs, Kimberly

Sandie Edwards said...

This is fantastic!!

Shanna Shands said...

Great patina style technique!

Shanna Shands said...

Great patina style technique!

DIANA L. said...

Great job Kassi. Love this idea

Colleen Dietrich said...

Such a beautiful (if dangerous ;) effect, Kassi! I always love to see the ways you use CIP. YOu're so talented!